A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes hemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice

Research Press Release | December 10, 2014

  • Leopards Hill cave in Zambia where we collected the bat samples
    Leopards Hill cave in Zambia where we collected the bat samples
  • Phylogenetic analysis of Leopards Hill virus and other viruses in the family bunyaviridae
    Phylogenetic analysis of Leopards Hill virus and other viruses in the family bunyaviridae
  • Leopards Hill virus 11SB23 strain injection to mice resulted in (A) liver and kidney dysfunction, (B) leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia
    Leopards Hill virus 11SB23 strain injection to mice resulted in (A) liver and kidney dysfunction, (B) leucopenia, and thrombocytopenia
Press Release
Key Points ・We discovered and isolated a novel nairovirus, Leopards Hill virus, in wild bats captured in Zambia.

・We constructed a mouse model infected with the nairovirus, which is associated with hemorrhagic fever-like symptoms.

・The established animal model with the Leopards Hill virus is expected to develop treatment and prophylaxis of nairovirus hemorrhagic disease.

Overview Bats can carry important zoonotic pathogens. Here we use a combination of next-generation sequencing and classical virus isolation methods to identify novel nairoviruses from bats captured from a cave in Zambia. The virus are hereafter designated as “Leopards Hill virus (LPHV).” When intraperitoneally injected into mice, a low-pathogenic LPHV 11SB17 strain causes only slight body weight loss, whereas a high-pathogenic LPHV 11SB23 strain produces acute and lethal disease closely resembling that observed with Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus in humans. We believe that our LPHV mouse model will be useful for research on the pathogenesis of nairoviral hemorrhagic disease.
Inquiries

Akihiro Ishii, Assistant Professor, Hokudai Center for Zoonosis Control in Zambia, Research Center for Zoonosis Control, Hokkaido University

TEL: +81-11-706-9517

FAX: +81-11-706-7370

E-mail: ishiia@czc.hokudai.ac.jp

Japanese

Link

 ナイロウイルス出血熱感染マウスモデルの開発にはじめて成功 
Publications

 A nairovirus isolated from African bats causes haemorrhagic gastroenteritis and severe hepatic disease in mice

(Nature Communications, 2014.12.2)

LATEST NEWS

University News | December 15, 2017
Hokkaido Summer Institute 2018 courses finalized!
University News | December 13, 2017
Japan-Russia Youth Forum 2017 held at Hokkaido University
University News | December 01, 2017
HU Ambassador wins the 2017 Volvo Environmental Prize
University News | November 13, 2017
Dinner meeting with Indonesian alumni
Student Awards | November 10, 2017
Student Awards: Graduate School of Medicine

ARCHIVES

CONNECT WITH US

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • YouTube
  • LinkedIn

BACK TO TOP