Optical microscope with sensitivity beating the limits of classical theory:harnessing quantum-engineered photons

Research Press Release | September 26, 2013

  • (a) Observation with entangled light (b) Observation with classical light
    (a) Observation with entangled light (b) Observation with classical light
  • The letter
    The letter "Q" carved in relief on the surface of a glass substrate with the thickness of about 100 atoms observed by using the conventional and new techniques. (a) Image obtained by using entangled light. The outline of the Q is far clearer compared with that seen in an image obtained by using classical light of the same intensity (b).
Press Release
Key Points ・Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University has developed the world’s first microscope that utilizes quantum entangled photons.

・It enables measurements to an accuracy of 1.35 times that of the limits of conventional light.

・It has the potential for application in a wide range of fields, including biology and medicine.

Overview The sensitivity of optical microscopes is limited by what is known as “standard quantum limit.”, or shot-noise limit.


Professor Shigeki Takeuchi of Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University (who is also an invited professor at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University), Dr. Takafumi Ono (post-doctoral fellow at the latter institution) and their colleagues have used quantum entangled light to develop the world’s first entanglement-enhanced microscope, which transcends these limits on sensitivity.


The success of this research will enable more highly sensitive measurements of living cells and other objects, and it has the potential for application in a wide range of fields, including biology and medicine.

Inquiries

Shigeki Takeuchi, Professor, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University

TEL: +81-6-6879-8548

FAX: +81-6-6876-3448

e-mail: takeuchi@es.hokudai.ac.jp

http://www.sanken.osaka-u.ac.jp/labs/qip/index_e.html

Japanese Links http://www.hokudai.ac.jp/news/2013/09/post-266.html
Publications Nature Communications

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